Sunday, August 24, 2014

Food Truckin', Comic Shoppin', and Antiquin'


After I heard about Just Jersey Fest, a gathering of food trucks coming to Randolph, NJ a couple of weeks back, I figured it might be a fun Sexy Armpit excursion. Food trucks have been enjoying a wave of popularity, especially in cities. I've really had no experience with food trucks, unless you want to count the ice cream man who I bought WWF Ice Cream bars from nearly 5 days a week for the span of 4 years in my early teens. Other than that, I've never eaten food that I purchased from a truck. I never really felt like I was missing out on anything either, but to have the option of sampling from ALL of them in one place seemed appealing to me since I don't live in an area with many food truck appearances.

I wasn't going into this one alone. I coerced friend, author, and co-star of the Sexy Armpit Show, Michael Gary Wirth aka @IdiotAtPlay, and his wife into going. We hopped in the car and headed up Route 287 on a super hot and sunny Saturday.

What started as your typical trip to eat at food trucks snowballed into an extensive trek up and down the Garden State searching for comic stores and ending with a brilliant finale: an unexpected drop-in to the most enormous and well stocked antique store of all time.


First, simply put, Just Jersey Fest was a big wide open lot that had a crazy amount of locally based food trucks parked around the perimeter. No false advertising here: there was a bunch food trucks, a DJ playing an odd array of oldies mixed with tunes you might here at The Colorado Cafe, and tons of people milling around, indecisive about what they should eat. What a perplexing situation. What altered my decision was how long the lines were at each truck. As a personal rule, I prefer not to stand in hideously long lines in the blazing hot sun. I melt very easily.

I'm not sure what I was expecting, but judging by the unique and often one of a kind cuisine that many food trucks are offering nowadays, my bar was set pretty high. Judging by some of these Food Network shows, it's apparent that every food truck has to have their own special gimmick or they won't last. Since I adore gimmicks, the idea of food trucks appealed to me, and I was pretty geared up to think that we were in for some real treats. Sometimes, my positivity is my weakness, and my friends faith in me is theirs. Sounded clunky, but those shrewd enough might extrapolate the Emperor Palpatine reference buried in there. Regardless, I've been bandying around the word extrapolate like I'm 6 years old and I just started working "shit" into my diatribes about how Drake's Devil Dogs would get stuck to my teeth and the roof of my mouth.

My first mission was to tour around the lot to make sure I knew each and every option I had to choose from. After my stroll, I was convinced there was nothing enticing me. I really wanted to be lured onto a line by a delicious odor or seduced by a superbly crafted stock photo of a shellacked empanada. As always, Mike and his wife were enthusiastic about the whole ordeal and they found a couple of trucks that had selections they wanted to try.

Mike went with a Cajun truck, one that I had mentioned sounded halfway decent moments earlier, but for some reason I opted for the Colombian food truck. I regretted not going with my first instinct. Always go with your first instinct no matter how impulsive - even if your first instinct is to order the 400-piece wing platter next time you're at Hooters. Not sure if that exists, but you can ask Mandy, your waitress. Make sure she brings you extra napkins.

Lauren got sticky rice from a Thai truck, which, unbeknownst to me, is a freaking dessert! Rice for dessert? I had no clue. I've heard of rice pudding, but this thing looked like fancy dessert sushi. Sing this to the tune of Iggy Azalea's "Fancy": "I'm not fancy, I didn't even kno-ow, that stick-y rice was an actual thing you can order for a Thai food truck." See, it actually works, but you might have to jam those last 15 words together pretty fast to get it to sound right. Where there's a will, there's a way people!

You can check out more on our food truck cuisine sampling in the video above, but I will tell you a little bit about the fries. Affectionately referred to as Disco Fries, (at least here in New Jersey) they are known to the rest of the country (apparently) as New Jersey Poutine. I don't know what the F poutine is, but I think Paxton Holley likes it. Disco Fries aren't fries soaked in the sweat that has dripped onto the dance floor, nor are they possessed by the spirit of Barry F'n Gibb, but they are staples of a New Jersey diner menu. Freaking French Fries doused with gravy and melted mozzarella cheese.

We placed an order for Disco Fries at Romano's Fries Truck, a truck who has an exclusive deal with C&C Cola. Depending on where you're from you may have never heard of this soda, but it was always a reasonable alternative to the mainstream soft drinks in the grocery store. That didn't swerve my opinion on this truck though. We waited patiently for what felt like 14 years for these stupid fries. Minus the exaggeration and I think we waited nearly 30 minutes, no joke. These were fries we were waiting for mind you, not a sizzling Kobe strip steak cooked to perfection. Finally, we received the equivalent of the fries you might get at the snack bar at your nephews Little League game, but drizzled with a little bit of gravy and some cheese. Meh. Nothing beats an NJ diner for these.

The ice pops were by far my favorite selection and the only thing I gravitated to immediately. Peace. Love. POPS are all natural, handcrafted ice pops made in New Jersey. The creative flavors are so dead on balls accurate and refreshing that I am 100% recommending that you try them if you are ever in the North Jersey area. Their cart is often seen around the streets of Hoboken. The pops are little pricey, but it's worth it. Considering the care that is taken in their preparation and the fact that a good chunk of the money you pay for one goes to charity, these ice pops are well worth the purchase. Eventually the company wants to get these into a few local supermarkets and I hope they succeed! Check out their official Facebook page at this link.

A list of flavor options were detailed on their chalk board. The decision was easy for me. Without hesitation I chose Honeydew Ginger Mint because I love honeydew and mint, but F the ginger. Mike and Lauren got the Pineapple Mojito and Strawberry Lemonade. All of these were awesome. You can watch us inhale them in the video. They hit the spot on a hot, swamp-assy Saturday.

We just about had our fill with the food truck fest and we decided we still had some motivation left in the tank. "Why don't we see if there's any comic book stores around here?" Lauren said, and we concurred that it was a great idea. Sitting in the back of the Mikemobile, I started searching on my phone for the zip codes of each town we passed through to cross check them on the comic locator site. God, that might be the geekiest sentence I've written in 10 years of this blog.

In total, we stopped at 3 comic book shops, all of which I'd never been to before. Now we are entering critical territory because this damn post should really be two parts, but I wouldn't do that to you...the waiting is the hardest part so said Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. F*ck it, let the Comic Book Store Tour commence!

I am always supportive of local stores and independent business, but I've been wrapped up in Comixology since day one because I wanted in on digital comics in a bad way, mostly because of the lack of storage space in my condo. Don't get me wrong, I still own all the comics I've had since I was a kid, but I have no need for physical comics anymore. Plus, I am crazy about the guided reading style of the digital format. If you've never experienced it, try it out, I think you'll dig it.

Our first stop was literally across the street from the food truck fest. All in One Collectibles in Randolph was filled with tables with some hardcore gaming going down. The large shop was stocked with 9 million Heroclix, comics, a few toys, and a ton of sports and non-sports trading cards. I was getting antsy. Onto the next one.

Next stop: Madison, NJ, a quaint, movie-set type town where we arrived at Dewey's Comic City. The interior was nice and it was like the Barnes and Noble of comic shops, only smaller. It was neatly filled to the brim with every type of comic and graphic novel you can think of. The concentration was on new releases rather than old, but they still had a sizable collection of back issues as well as some random collectibles and t-shirts.

I think Mike saved the best for last. He hinted earlier that we should go to COMIC FORTRESS in Somerville, NJ and I was game. I always say YES to going anywhere that has Fortress in it's name (i.e Fortress of Fangs, Fortress of Steele.) This place was seriously as incredible as Mike mentioned, (read Stop #6 on his Free Comic Book Day Tour log.) Not only do they have quite a huge selection of comics stocked on the shelves, but they also have the largest inventory of DC and Marvel statues, busts, and action figure collector sets that I've ever seen in a comic/collectible shop. If it was the early '90s I'd probably be begging my Dad to bring me to this vast emporium every week after we made our stop at Steve's Comic Relief.

I'm proud of myself. As much as I was tempted, I bought nothing all day except 2 giant sized Red Bulls.

As if all the previous excitement on this day wasn't enough, I didn't think it could get any more fantastical, but, IT DID! We inadvertently extended our little adventure even more. While walking back to the car we stumbled upon the Somerville Antique store. This place pulled me in like I was in a tractor beam. With zero expectations of the enchanted land of tchotchkes, we entered. Before us was the most insanely huge antique store I've ever set foot in. Two expansive floors with nooks and crannies of non-stop antique absurdity.

If I described all of what I saw at the antique store we'd be here for another 37 paragraphs and I don't want to do that to you. It would be a violation of common decency. To see the contents of this wondrous, albeit pricey place, go watch the video! 

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

The 10 Best Pics of Rowdy Roddy Piper and Jay From Monster Mania Con 28!



With the summer installment of Monster Mania in the history books, the countdown to Halloween is fast-approaching. Although it's a horror convention, my mind never associates it with the onset of the Halloween season. Not sure why, but when you think about it, in merely a matter of days, Dinosaur Dracula will be signaling to all that the countdown is on. Halloween is right around the corner, yet this is still a summer event, one that's ripe for escorting the sweltering season directly out the door without passing go. Good riddance to you summer, I say. Oh, I suppose you want to know more about Monster Mania? OK, I'll give you all I can remember.

Let me get this out from the get-go: we didn't get drunk with the Joker and Freddy Krueger like we did that other time, but once again, the forces of Dinosaur Dracula, Freddy in Space, and The Sexy Armpit came together and had quite an interesting time to say the least. It's a scene not for the faint of heart. You'd probably like to know all about our sordid Monster Mania tales from this time around, but we've got to keep some decorum here, plus, details are fuzzy. Put it this way, there was a lot of liquor and VHS tapes involved. And Tom Bryce's pretzels. It was a veritable Shit Pretzel Fest.


As I mentioned, it's a little foggy, but the bits of this event that I do remember include buying a Princess Bride poster AND more monumentally, meeting Rowdy Roddy Piper. With the Hot Rod in New Jersey, how could I miss the chance to meet one of my favorite WWE Legends of all time?

I think I must've gained a lifetime membership to the club. You know that club, Those Who've Met Hulk Hogan and Rowdy Roddy Piper Within a Matter of Days From Each Other Club. It's not the kind of braggable anecdote as say, being in the mile high club, but it's a tidbit that'll most certainly be engraved in my headstone.

While waiting on line I noticed Piper was smiling and taking his time to talk with every one of his fans. Fortunately, Matt (@DinosaurDracula) arrived, grabbed my phone and snapped over 20 photos to make damn sure we commemorated this historic meeting of the minds. It was a nearly impossible task to narrow it down, but here are the top 10 best photos of Hot Rod and I from our impromptu photo shoot. Some of the shots are different, yet so completely the same.

As they were swiping through these photos on my phone, a few of my friends and family members asked what I talked to Piper about. Seeing 20+ photos of he and I prompted one of my friends to ask "how long was he talking to you for?" No joke, it had to be at least 35 minutes. There were "BULLSHIT" chants coming from the people in line behind me. To be clear, we didn't talk wrestling, we didn't talk They Live, and we damn sure didn't talk politics. But he did offer me a recipe. It's just like good old Hot Rod, recipes are so typical of him. You can see how good he is with a blender in that episode of Legends House. Piper vs. The Blender, a feud that can only be rivaled by Hogan/Piper.


The blur was actually present in the room. It eventually dissipated, but, at first, it was like The Mist.


JAY:
"Hey Hot Rod! How exciting it is to meet you!"

HOT ROD:
"Hey, thank you man, what's your name?" 

JAY
"I'm Jay."

HOT ROD:
"Jay, I love that shirt!" 
(I'm wearing the Panther shirt that Roddy wore to the ring in the early '80s.)


JAY:
"It's classic! I'm about 6 tequilas in, so excuse me if I sound like it."

HOT ROD:
"Ohhhohoo, so you want to be a big shot don't ya?"

JAY:
"Well, not really, I just wanted to get drunk with my friends."


HOT ROD:
"Now that you mention it, you are lookin' a little bit under the weather, You know what, I know exactly what you need. It's what I used to make when I was oh, knee high to a grasshopper."


JAY:
"Specifically, what kind of concoction are you going to supply me with the recipe for, Roddy? Not that raw egg in the blender gimmick that Hulk gave Mean Gene I hope!"

(Just when he thought he had all the answers, I obviously changed the questions.) 

HOT ROD:
"Now, don't insult me kid or I'll crack your head with a coconut, trust me you'll want to listen to the information I'm about to lay out for you."

JAY:
"I'm all ears, Hot Rod."

HOT ROD:
"Do you remember once upon a time when that little meatball Rachel Ray's cooking show was a hot commodity? Well it can't touch Mixology with Rowdy Roddy!"

JAY:
"I'm confused, are you saying you're changing the name of Piper's Pit?"

HOT ROD:
"Listen up, stop your lips from yapping for one minute. If you want to be big time, you're gonna have one of these with me"

Piper proceeds to instruct me on how to concoct a Hot Roddy.

HOT ROD:
"Ever hear your grandmother talk about drinking a Hot Toddy when she was sick? Well, this is what I call a Hot Roddy."

JAY:
"I assume it can cure what ails ya...or ails me. After all the drinking and partying at Monster Mania so far, this is just what I needed. Some kind of an elixir to rejuvenate me."

HOT ROD:
"You're damn right, and remember Jay, this drink ain't FOR EVERYBODY, but if you want a banana have a banana, us, we gonna have ourselves a Hot Roddy."



HOT ROD
Oh no...

JAY:
Oh no, what?


HOT ROD:
Oh no...who is that taking our picture? Please don't tell me it's that damn motherf*ckin' Dino Drac, that sonofabitch! OK, OK, that's enough pictures, you know where you can stick those VHS tapes! This is the last picture and then get that photographer the hell out of here!


I have come here to show you at least 10 photos and kick ass, and I'm all out of photos.

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Nerd Lunch 145: The Poor Man's Podcast




X is the Poor Man's Y is the subject of this week's episode of the Nerd Lunch Podcast. Once again I'm in the 4th chair joining Pax, Jeeg, and Carlin from Pod, James Pod (just want to stress that he's not C.T.) It was an interesting discussion about actors, toys, and cartoons. Download it to your phone or iPod or check it out above. Thanks for listening!

Saturday, August 16, 2014

Interview With Pinup Artist Erica Hesse


Erica Hesse brought to life our vision to commemorate The Sexy Armpit's 10th birthday in a vivid, epic work of art. In my interview with her, we get an in-depth look at her creative approach, her influences, her favorite comics and horror movies, and growing up in New Jersey.



SA: I've had this idea for a commission from you in my head for quite a long time and it's finally come to fruition and it's very exciting. Since I'm not an artist, how does it feel knowing that you've created the exact piece of art that I had in my head?

EH: It's pretty rewarding, as an artist you can only hope you can bring every idea to life that the person has- and be able to do it justice. Especially when the client has original ideas and thoughts and you want to be able to convey what they are thinking. I think it helps in this case, a lot of the subject matter I'm familiar with and a fan of. So it made it that much easier to interpret and have fun with! 

I'm glad you had some fun with this project! Do you prefer to create a piece of art directly from your imagination or do you like having more of a direction such as in commission work?

I like doing both to be honest. Doing art straight from my imagination is therapeutic and freeing. I can do whatever I would like with no one to tell me any different. But I do like commission work too, because it keeps me on the straight and narrow and gives me a sense of direction. I learn a lot from each commission and it gives me a new perspective on how to solve or approach each new piece of art. I find that a lot of commission work I get the clients usually have a lot of imagination and creativity, some things that I wouldn't think of doing. So it's refreshing, challenging, and fun to do these pieces of art, subject matter that is "outside of the box" for me. There is this one project I've been working on with a writer for a while now, about a year or so. It's completely different than what I'm used to illustrating, it's really creative and thought provoking. The story is pretty amazing and we have a great working relationship. He has a great imagination and has a clear vision of what he wants, and that's exciting. I welcome other people's ideas and thoughts when it comes to art, I think a large part of it is due to the some of the training I had. I worked for a company before where I had a lot of art direction and creativity within a team. I welcome that because in some cases you only become better at what you do.

Can you briefly tell us about the process you went through to create this piece? You incorporate traditional and digital art, right?

Sure! You're right I did incorporate traditional and digital art for this piece of art.  Every artist has a different way of approaching a new piece of art, I feel I kind of do things unorthodox as far as my approach in laying out the composition. I usually sketch/pencil in the main characters first, trying to capture a feel for them, then build up the background and elements around them. I usually do two different concepts and email them to the client to see if I'm heading in the right direction concerning their ideas. If it's approved I then go back and print out the rough concept, lightbox the rough onto a piece of heavy bristol paper and start working on the final pencils. The final pencils is a tighter and more clean version of the rough concept. From there I ink over my pencils with a brush. I typically use a Pentel Pocket Brush Pen or a Windsor and Newton watercolor brush. All depending on the look I need to achieve. When the inks are done, I erase any remaining pencil lines and it's ready to be scanned and digitally painted. Once I have the line art scanned in and cleaned up, I started blocking in loose colors using Photoshop and my Wacom tablet. From there it's a lot of playing around with colors and determining if any small details in the composition need to be changed. Colors, for me, I find at times to be challenging, I like them to be heavily saturated and have a certain "pop" to them. I work best when I'm working on a piece of art and walk away from it for a day or so, that way I have a fresh eye when I look at it again. Sometimes it changes everything.

And that POP is certainly distinct in the final piece! How do you feel about it? Is there an aspect of it you think is exceptional?

I was a bit concerned as I first started digitally coloring the art and how I was going to make it all work with each other. Honestly I think every artist has that thought when they approach a piece of art, the gears are constantly turning and asking yourself "How am I going to make this work?" But as the piece progressed I was pretty happy on how it was turning out, I really love it.

The parts of the art I think are exceptional are how a lot of pop culture references are sprinkled throughout the art, from the He-Man sword to the Toxic Avenger-like waste barrels, the art is one big fun New Jersey pop culture piece. I love adding the little elements in there that perhaps only people from New Jersey would get. I honestly could have added more, but didn't want to take away from the main focal point, which is the characters. l do have to say I did add a little personal touch in the art. The license plate on the beach is one number/letter off of my own old license plate I had for years.

Ha! That's awesome. A little Easter Egg hidden in there! I love it. Switching gears, I've always been a huge fan of pinup culture. When did you realize you were in love with pinup style art? Is it something you realized you excelled at and just continued to do or is it legitimately your favorite style to create?

I think pinup style art has been part of me since I was a kid, it was somehow always around me in some shape or form. A lot of the comics I read growing up had a "pinup" aspect to the art, Archie's Betty and Veronica, Katy Keene, Millie the Model, Sabrina the Teenage Witch all had an impression on me growing up. I didn't actually discover pinup (in the form of photography and art) until years later. I knew this guy and he had this calendar of Pinup art, I believe it was by Olivia. I remember the image for that month, the woman was a brunette and had on a white man's dress shirt and it looked innocent and incredibly sexy at the same time. And it wasn't a photograph, it was a painting! I wasn't drawing for a few years around that time, that image resonated with me and was in the back of my head. Fast forward some years later I was introduced to Bettie Page and was intrigued by her. I was at a point in my life where it seemed pinup art was always reaching out to me, calling to me and I finally made the leap. I guess you can say it's been a slow steady progression.

I don't know if pinup art was something I thought I excelled at, it's definitely a form of art I enjoy doing. Some people liked drawing animals or wildlife scenery, for example. I like illustrating those things too, but I'm always drawn back to illustrating women. I've always been drawn to the female figure and consider it to be one of the most beautiful forms in nature. It's a form of expression, an extension of myself if that makes sense.


Well, we think you definitely excel at it! As an added bonus, much of your subject matter incorporates comic art, horror, burlesque - which just so happen to be things that I am heavy into. Your piece Roller Bride of Frankenstein really seems to sum up the stuff you enjoy. With that said, can you share with us your favorite horror movies and comic books?

Ooh yes! Ha, I sure can! My favorites change here and there, but here's what's on top of my head at the moment. For horror movies, I love a lot of the classics. All of the classic monster movies, Bride of Frankenstein,Frankenstein, The Wolfman, The Mummy. I love Night of the Living Dead, White Zombie, Dawn of the Dead, Fright Night…I could go on and on! Fan of the first few Nightmare on Elm Street movies. For newer horror movies, none stick to the top of my head at the moment. I did recently see the remake of Evil Dead. While it was good, nothing beats the original.

For comic books, I'm currently liking/reading Brian Wood's X-Men, The Strange Talent of Luther Strode, and the new Harley Quinn series by Palmiotti. Other favorites include Linsner's Lucifer's Halo, Terry Moore's Strangers in Paradise, Wonder Woman, Witchblade and The Walking Dead series. I usually go for comics with strong and interesting women in them. Or if they have zombies.

Zombies are always a plus. I'm enjoying the new Harley Quinn series as well. Also on the DC front, what are your thoughts on the promo photo of Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman from Batman v. Superman?

I thought the promo shot looked good, but kind of holding back my opinions until I see the movie. There's a lot of thoughts and concerns that are rambling around in my head but I know that will probably change once I see the movie.


Can you tell us some of your artistic influences?

I kind of have a mash up of people, art, or artists that I'm inspired by. In no particular order: Gil Elvgren, George Petty, Alberto Vargas, Alphonse Mucha, Dan De Carlo, Stan Goldberg, Linsner, Coop, R. Black, Bettie Page, Rita Hayworth, Dita, Mosh…to name a few. Tara McPherson and Tokidoki are big for me in the Designer Vinyl Toy World. 

I'm a big fan of Vargas, De Carlo, and Miss Mosh as well. How about influence from your ? Were you born and raised in New Jersey? Growing up, tell us some of the places your frequented or fond memories you have from living here.

Oh heck yes. Born and raised here in good ol' South Jersey. A lot of the memories I have growing up is where I used to live, in Egg Harbor City. I spent a lot of my time in the Don and Tom's Newspaper store and the local Ben Franklin five and dime. Mostly buying comics and plotting which Barbie doll was going to be added next in my collection. I had a huge Barbie doll collection. It's funny, I was never allowed to leave them naked (undressed) they always had to be fully clothed. I had a few Ken dolls but they were boring to me. I used to "borrow" my brother's G.I. Joe dolls and make them Barbie's boyfriend. The guy had flocked hair, how can Ken compete with that? I think I even somehow managed to make my brother's 18-inch Alien figure Barbie's boyfriend too. Barbie had great taste.

As far as places I checked out, I would say Ocean City was the top of the list. To me it was the "place to go" it had a little bit of everything. It had the boardwalk, ice cream, the beach, the Boardwalk Mall and of course boys. I was a bit of a boy crazy nut then. But what teen wasn't? Of course I was rarely on the beach, I was always wanting to hop on the water slides or stuff my face with boardwalk pizza. Man, I loved that. And I used to tan, A LOT. So glad I gave that up…eventually, ha. Now I'm as "un-beachy" as you can get. The only tan I get anymore is a driver's tan.

Same. I get as much tan as David the vampire from The Lost Boys. Similarly, I used to take my sisters Barbie dolls to have my GI Joes mingle with them on her party boat. It was a blast. So, what's on the horizon for Erica Hesse? Are there any upcoming projects or comic shows you'd like to mention?

I've been keeping busy with quite a few sketch cards projects this year. Some are currently out right now. I did a few exclusive sketch cards for Zenescope's Oz and Grimm Fairy Tales for San Diego Comic Con. I also did some cards for Chaos and the Women of Dynamite which were only available at the San Diego Comic Con as well. I have some more sketch card sets in the works but can't mention them really until they are talked about in the press or been released. I've been kind of laying low on the comic con scene (which is really hard) this year due to commission work and the day job. I also made a point not to do any shows this year because I really, really want to jump back on some things I've been putting off. As much as I LOVE drawing pinups, I'm really itching to work on some sequentials/comics! Don't get me wrong, I'm still working on pinups, but I just want to develop some ideas that have been in my head the past few years. These stories are dying to come out. I'll be sure to talk about them when the time is right. To keep up to date on any news you can follow me on www.hesse-art.com or my Facebook page over at www.facebook.com/TheArtofEricaHesse.

We'll be on the lookout! As we wrap up, being a fan of your work, I've read that you've really made your own way. You practiced hard to become a great artist and carved a space for yourself via Internet/social media as well as setting up at shows such as Wizard World to sell your prints. It's very inspirational, so if you could leave us with some sort of motivational wisdom that might apply to anyone, not just artists, no matter how cheesy it might be, that would be awesome!

I guess the only thing I can say is do what you love. You're going to get criticism and feedback on no matter what you do, just take it all in stride and grow from it- don't let it affect you negatively. Do the best that you can do. Don't worry about what this person is doing or how successful that person is, that's a total mind killer. No art would ever get accomplished if we constantly compared or doubted ourselves.

Excellent advice Erica and thanks for the interview! The new Sexy Armpit artwork KICKS ASS!

Erica obviously has our full endorsement, so check out some of her art here:
http://www.storenvy.com/stores/159375-the-art-of-erica-hesse

Thursday, August 14, 2014

Sexy Armpit's EPIC 10th Birthday Surprise!

Even though the Sexy Armpit doesn't turn 10 until November, you're getting a sneak peak, mostly because we just can't wait to show you! For this milestone, we don't need fancy desserts that pack on the pounds, instead, watch this video to see what we got for The Sexy Armpit's upcoming 10th Birthday. It's EPIC!

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